Nov
21
2013

Blue Springs Community Mourns The Loss of Alum Joey Butler



Posted by Tiger Pride in Alumni

From The Martian (1988): The Compass Staff.  Pictured back: Kenny Cargill Smith, Will Nichols, Joey Butler, Keelyn Waycaster, Robbin Perry, Jerry Watson, Sara Kneipp. Front: Natalie New, Kelli Guess, Neil McClendon.  Butler served as editor of the ETBU student newspaper.

From The Martian (1988): The Compass Staff. Pictured back: Kenny Cargill-Smith, Will Nichols, Joey Butler, Keelyn Waycaster, Robbin Perry, Jerry Watson, Sara Kneipp. Front: Natalie New, Kelli Guess, Neil McClendon. Butler served as editor of the ETBU student newspaper.

Pastor Joey Butler made a difference in the Blue Springs, Mo. Community where God called him to serve. Butler, a 1988 grad of ETBU, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 17, after a lengthy fight with cancer. His impact as a minister of the Gospel was evident by the standing- room- only attendance as well as from the ones who shared about him on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at his Celebration of Life service.

Butler, was the co-founder of Gatehouse Church in Blue Springs, along with Scott Sterling. As the cancer was zapping his strength, he resigned in March because he humbly felt that he could no longer serve Gatehouse with the passion and energy that the members deserved. The Kansas City Star was present that day and published a video on their website. You can view the video by clicking here. Read the story written by Kansas City Star reporter Lee Hill Kavanaugh by clicking here.

The Tiger Pride team reached out to Bill Althaus, a sportswriter for The Examiner, and he shared, “I don’t know an individual who was more loved and honored than Joey Butler. The impact he made on the lives of people in and around Blue Springs, Mo., will last a lifetime, as those he touched will touch others. At his celebration of life, more than 1,200 people flooded the Performing Arts Center at Blue Springs High School. They filled the aisles, the lobby and every seat. And I am sure that most of the people in their heard this from Joey: ‘What can I do for you today, and what have you done for God?’ He will be missed, but he will never be forgotten.”

One of the ongoing ministries Butler had was serving as the chaplain of the local high school football team.  FOX 4 TV in Kansas City featured Butler in a sportscast recently, to view the report, click here.

Althaus reported in the Examiner on Wednesday after attending the Celebration of Life service  the night before that there was laughter, tears, laughter and more laughter as Butler’s friends, family members and his former college roommate-turned-pastor Neil McClendon celebrated the life of a man who impacted the lives of far too many to imagine.

“Joey wasn’t a thoroughbred; he was a plow horse,” said the fiery McClendon, who regaled the audience with tales of young Joey Butler and the way he developed his love of Christ and helping those in need.

McClendon talked about how Butler would keep plowing, so he could meet and help as many people as possible.

The standing-room-only crowd, which included the Blue Springs High School football team and coaching staff, was a living, breathing testimony to Butler’s devotion.

To read the full report by Althaus, click here.

Our prayers and sympathy to his wife, Dawn Boseman Butler, an ETBU alum as well, his sons, Joey Tyler “Ty” Butler, Zacchaeus Jon “Zac” Butler,  and daughter Josy Dawn Butler.

The impact that this servant leader had for his community is immeasurable but has been revealed to Him in heaven.