My original thoughts in April of 2013

My thoughts
I thought I would post the grant proposal I wrote. As we go through the year let’s see how close I stick to the original intent.

Here is what I was thinking back in April 2013:

Being a Christian in Biology
The mission statement and vision statement of East Texas Baptist University center on the integration of faith and learning in the pursuit of truth. Biological science, by its very nature, is the pursuit of truth in the physical observable universe. Jesus is spiritual truth and the creator of the physical, observable universe. Studying the Bible, prayer and meditation are often times considered the only way to know Christ and to find the truth. Most Christians forget that we may come to know Christ better, more fully, by understanding that which He created. Humans have built barriers between faith and science. Christ has no such barriers. Reflection on Christ’s teachings in conjunction with studying His creation leads to a fuller understanding of the truth and the nature of Jesus as God and Creator.

Those who search for truth need to have the ability and skill to discern truth from propaganda, prejudice, and lies. They need to be able to think with clarity, accuracy, depth, and breadth to understand the significance of the information being presented and the fairness of the presentation. Most people live their lives with a lower order of thinking. They lack reflection and logic relying mainly on distorted, uninformed, self-serving, self-deceiving, and prejudicial thinking. Many Christians believe something is true simply because it’s what they have always believed. For example, many Southern Baptists believe that dancing is a sin. This is not a Biblical truth, it is a cultural construct. As Christian scholars it is our responsibility to teach/lead/model the pursuit of truth with Christ-like thinking. Jesus was a profound critical thinker. He demanded clarity and accuracy from those who were the interpreters of the Law. He challenged the relevance of the traditions of the religious leaders and required His followers to think deeply about complex issues. He taught His followers to broaden their preconceived ideas to include people who had been previously excluded from God’s teachings. He dared to ask questions about the way life was lived and whether or not that way made sense or was fair.

Christ demanded that we know the truth in order to be free. He demands that we be free from the Law, prejudice, hypocrisy, cowardice, arrogance, and conformity. These are all attributes of the sin-filled life. In order to be free we must be humble, have the courage to face the tough issues, persevere in integrity, fairness, and Christ-centered autonomy. To be free we need to think critically the way Christ demands. In my reflections I will discuss what it means to be a critical thinker and the attributes of a critical thinker. I will use biological/bioethical questions and issues to model integration of Biblical principles with scientific reasoning. I will model intrinsic motivation in order to inspire others to begin their search for the truth. By embracing Christ-centered faith, I will model engaging the mind of a critical thinker in order to empower leaders to be free to pursue truth where ever it may be found.

2013 IFR Grant: Meet our writers

Congratulations to the five members of the ETBU faculty who received grant funding through the Intersection for Faith & Reflection Grant offered by the CECS. We look forward to your contributions to this blog in the coming months as we examine the relationship between reflection and our faith.

Read more about the Faith & Reflection Project…

CECS-Scholar-Winners39

Dr. Mark Miller, Dr. Catherine Cone, Dr. Jennifer Bashaw, & Dr. Laci McRee
(also receiving grant funds is Dr. Stan Coppinger – not pictured)

 

The Intersection: Where Faith & Scholarship Collide

Greetings! Welcome to The Intersection — the online space for the Center for Excellence in Christian Scholarship (CECS) and ETBU. In support of the CECS Vision, The Intersection provides an outlet for the ongoing discussion centered around the question of what it means to “create and participate in scholarship that embraces a Christian worldview without compromising in the pursuit of scientific truth and intellectual inquiry” (CECS Vision Statement). Our hope is that this blog will become a place for scholars to reflect and share their ideas on the issues of our day.

The idea for The Intersection came from a series of grants that have been offered by the CECS in recent years. The first, 2012′s The Intersection of Faith & Discpline, explored the connection between faith and academic disciplines by requiring the grant recipients to “design an instructional model for examining the intersection of faith, disciple and application outside the classroom and/or outside the regular limitations of classroom discourse” (IFD Grant 2012). In Spring 2013, 5 grant recipients have been selected to participate in The Intersection of Faith & Reflection. These recipients will be asked to begin posting weekly to this blog as they reflect on their faith, their disciplines, and their classroom experience. To learn more about the IFR Grant and view profiles, go to Faith & Reflection Project. These bloggers will be the trailblazers for our blog and establish a framework for future postings.

We’re glad you’ve found us and hope you’ll make an effort to follow along as we begin our blogging journey. Have questions? comments? suggestions? Write to us at cecs[at]etbu.edu or post a comment below.

With great anticipation for the future,

The Intersection team