Has Texas Been Bought?

Has Texas been bought?

According to a recent study by East Texas Baptist University Associate Professor Elijah M. Brown and student Taylor Cruse, 81% of all members of the Texas House of Representatives have received financial support from the payday loan industry.

In a recent university class project I worked with students to identify the extent of the payday and auto title loan industry in Texas.  According to the Christian Life Commission, payday and auto title loans are “high cost, small-dollar loans offered to individuals without a credit check and little consideration of their ability to repay.”

Photo Credit: Thomas Hawk via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: Thomas Hawk via Compfight cc

Money Mutual, a somewhat typical payday lender, proclaims, “Get up to $1,000 as soon as tomorrow!” and then in fine print on their homepage note, “the typical representative APR range is somewhere between 261% and 1304% for a 14 day loan.”

In Texas the average payday loan is $475 and effective APR ranges from 250% to 800%.  According to a recent report from the Center for Public Policy Priorities, “Texans paid more in payday and auto title loan fees in 2013 compared to 2012 and remained in debt longer, even though they took out fewer total loans during that same time.”

Payday and auto title loans offer “no meaningful protections for borrowers,” imperil financial viability, restrict financial growth, and trap individuals in cycles of debt.  One student voiced his worry that his parents who had taken out a payday loan in his name and without his consent might jeopardize his credit and future earning potential.

Nationally:

  • There are over 22,000 payday and auto title loan locations in the United States (meaning there are more payday and auto title loan locations in the USA than there are McDonalds);
  • Payday and auto title loans generate an estimated $27 billion in loans each year;
  • The typical borrower ultimately pays $822.50 in principal and interest for a $350 loan;
  • Over 80% of payday borrowers take out more than one loan per year;
  • In Texas, a majority of borrowers are in their 20s and 30s, 59% are women many of whom are single mothers, borrowers include all major ethnic groups though there is a disproportionately high percentage of African American borrowers;
  • The majority of individuals who utilize these loans do so not for one time emergencies but to pay for recurring basic expenses such as utilities, food and housing.

Payday and auto title loans trap borrowers into cycles of debt by charging usurious and exorbitant APR and often refusing partial payments.  The following are actual APR charges self-reported by a variety of payday loan companies on their websites:

How can this be legal?

The Texas Constitution notes that in the absence of other legislation individual borrowers should not be charged more than 10% APR.  In 2005 the payday loan industry reorganized themselves into Credit Service Organizations (CSOs) which were designed in 1987 to help individuals with bad credit receive small loans from third party vendors.  An individual who visits a payday store in Texas will therefore be offered a loan from a third party vendor at less than 10% actual APR thus satisfying the legal requirement of the state.  For procuring this loan the CSO will then leverage a fee and in Texas there are no regulatory caps on these fees.  This causes the effective APR to sharply rise into the hundreds of percentage points.

Payday and auto title loans can quickly propel people into a cyclical debt bondage.  According to the Pew Charitable Trust, 41% of borrowers need a cash infusion from an outside source in order to pay off a payday loan.  In 2012, 35,000 cars or an average of 95 cars per day were repossessed in the state of Texas due to defaults on auto title loans.

Unfortunately, churches and other nonprofits are implicitly at the forefront of subsidizing this industry.  At times individual borrowers pay off their payday loans and then request and receive help from churches and other nonprofits to cover expenses such as food, rent and utility bills.

The challenge, in the words of a timely episode of Last Week Tonight by Jon Oliver, is that regulating this industry is “like playing legislative whack-a-mole.”

This is especially the case in Texas.  The Office of the Consumer Credit Commissioner is tasked with protecting consumers from predatory lending practices.  However, an El Paso Times article observed that the current individual overseeing this state agency is William J. White who is also a Vice President of Cash America, a company hit with sanctions last November for abusive practices.

The situation in Texas is perhaps even far worse than the above indicates.  Working closely with East Texas Baptist University student Taylor Cruse, public campaign donations for every member of the Texas House of Representatives was meticulously considered.  This new research revealed:

  • 81% of all members of the Texas House of Representatives have received financial support from the payday loan industry;
  • 70.9% of all Democrats and 87.4% of all Republicans have received monetary contributions from a lobbyist working on behalf of the payday or auto title loan industry;
  • 56.4% of Democrats and 81.1% of Republicans have received $1,000 or more from this industry; 18.2% of Democrats and 43.2% of Republicans have received more than $5,000 and 1.8% of Democrats and 16.8% of Republicans have received more than $10,000 in cash donations from this industry;
  • The median amount received by Democrats was $1,000 while for Republicans it was $3,250.

This is not a Democratic or Republican issue but a common good and public wellbeing issue begging the questin: has the payday and auto title loan industry bought the Texas legislative assembly?

4 - Chart on Payday ContributionsThe payday and auto title loan industry is a predatory industry running counter to sound financial principles, the common good, and multiple biblical commands.

How can churches, nonprofits and other concerned citizens respond to this situation? Perhaps the following are five beginning points:

  1. Emphasize fair living wages and fair lending practices for all;
  2. Incorporate awareness and education about the duplicity of the payday and auto title loan industry into financial stewardship initiatives;
  3. Help individuals pay off payday and auto title loans;
  4. Contact state and national representatives and, whatever their previous record, ask them from this point forward to refrain from receiving any additional financial contributions from lobbyists working on behalf of the payday and auto title loan industry;
  5. Support the work of the Christian Life Commission and other organizations working to limit the injustices perpetrated by these industries.

EMB

Imagio Missions: The First Ethic for Missions?

Missions is at the heart of God. (Click to Tweet)

Where then is the first biblical passage detailing an ethic for missions?

Children Holding Balloon

Photo Credit: rachel_titiriga via Compfight cc

We live in a time of diversifying missions practices, shifting priorities and timeframes, and changing personnel.  Two weeks ago the International Mission Board (IMB) elected Radical pastor David Platt as the new IMB PresidentAt 36, Platt is the youngest individual to serve the IMB in this capacity.

This announcement is in close proximity to key personnel changes at the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship (CBF) where on September 1 Steven Porter was slated to begin as the new Coordinator of Global Missions.  Called a “strategic and innovative former field personnel,” Porter was most recently a lecturer in missions and global Christianity at George W. Truett Theological Seminary and at age 41 is also a relatively young leader.

Though from different backgrounds, transitions at two of the leading Baptist missions organizations in the United States to next generation leadership perhaps signals renewed intentionality to embrace the changing missions dynamics of the twenty-first century.  In an increasingly urban, religiously diverse and migratory world, shifts in missionary leadership do not, however, alter a biblical missional ethic established as early as Genesis 1.

There are approximately 7 billion people living today.  Missiologists consider “unevangelized” any country in which less than 50% of anyone in that country has heard the Gospel.  By this definition, according to the World Christian Database of the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, there are currently 4,402 unevangelized people groups representing 1.72 billion individuals or 24.9% of the world’s total population. (Click to Tweet)

This past week students in an ETBU missions class were challenged to ground their understanding of missions into a robust biblical framework beyond well-known passages such as Matthew 28:16-20 or Acts 1:8.  It was suggested that perhaps the first and earliest ethic for missions is found in Genesis 1:27:

So God created mankind in his own image,

in the image of God he created them;

male and female he created them (NIV).

Known more often for the theological articulation of the imagio Dei or image of God in all people, this passage has a clear missional implication.  It speaks to God’s global scope and prerogative as it asserts that all individuals are made without exception in the image of God.  To categorically state that God is the sole author of life is to also note that God intends a relationship with each individual who has received his indelible mark.  These individuals cannot be who God intended for them to fully be until they enter into a relationship with God.  To affirm the image of God is to affirm the call to missions. (Click to Tweet)

Moreover, if a Christian claims that another is made in the image of God the only ethical option available to the Christian is to then tell the individual about the God in whose image they are made.  One cannot – in good faith – proclaim to the 1.72 billion individuals living in unevangelized contexts that they are made in God’s image and then not tell them about that God and his desire to enter into a relationship with them.

World Map

Photo Credit: rogiro via Compfight cc

As Genesis 1:27 clearly evidences, even with cultural and ethnic divisions people are after all still fundamentally people.  It is easy to get swept up in the differences – different geographies, different languages, different cultures, different value systems, different skin tones – and yet even within the reality of all of these differences we are all fundamentally and undeniably people equal to each other and equal in the eyes of God.  Missions recognizes that if God created all people in his image then it is possible, indeed it is the calling of Christians to cross over these divisions and to no longer allow them to remain as barriers.

Christ-followers ought to serve in the midst of communities, build relationships in the most difficult of neighborhoods, stand with the most marginalized, vocationally live with intentionality as outposts of the kingdom, and love holistically among the 1.72 billion individuals living in unevangelized contexts for fundamentally and undeniably we believe these are places filled with those made in the image of God.  Even if some of these places are dangerous, difficult, inconvenient, or otherwise labeled as “enemies,” do we not have a responsibility to tell them the Good News about this God in whose image they are made?

It is not enough to simply affirm that all individuals are made in the imagio Dei.  There is a corresponding and compelling theological and missional implication that ought to shape the ordering of our lives.

If we believe that all individuals are made in the image of God, can our mission be anything less than helping all individuals know the God in whose image they are made?

EMB

 

Small… Large… MEDIUM! I’m the MEDIUM!

“The medium is the message.”

Marshall Mcluhan

Photo Credit: Abode of Chaos via Compfight cc

This quote is one of the most famous phrases in the discipline of Communication Studies, and was originally voiced by Marshal McLuhan, a media scholar from the Toronto school of Communication Theory.

His point is that how you say something is just as important as what you say. (Click to Tweet)

In many cases, it may end up being even more important.

Studying Communication is so important to me, and what I really love, because it allows me (and every Comm scholar) to understand where other people are coming from, and what they are trying to say through the words they choose to convey their message. I get very excited for each new class – a chance to share my passion with a new group of students, and a chance for us to learn together about what Communication Studies can mean together.

I have loved Communication Studies since my first Communication class at Nebraska Wesleyan University in 2005. It was at this small, private university that I first heard McLuhan’s words. They have been repeated throughout my journey to a PhD, but it is only now that I’ve first made a connection between McLuhan’s message and Jesus’s.

That statement may seem shocking and sad, but ETBU is my first school environment where the integration of faith and learning is placed at such a high priority.

It is refreshing, to be honest.

At so many public schools, and even some religious universities, professors (and professors-in-training) are encouraged, pushed, even threatened to take religion out of the classroom so that we don’t offend anyone.

In my first semester at ETBU, I was struggling to bring my religious views into class because I felt as if it had almost been beaten out of me. But now, with the opportunity to reflect on how my discipline relates to faith and Christianity, I am struck by the complete obviousness of it all!

Allow me to show you what I mean…

Jesus was God’s son, sent to earth to deliver God’s message of salvation – to COMMUNICATE it to us! (Click to Tweet)

He lived a perfect life, and focused on sharing God’s mercy with the world – communicating even still. A connection to my discipline if I’ve ever heard one.

But the connection that really hit me over the head when I started thinking about McLuhan’s emphasis on the medium, is that we are the medium that God has chosen to spread his message today. That was the plan all along…remember… the Great Commission…

Bible Study

Photo Credit: rafa2010 via Compfight cc

“Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you” (Matthew 28:19-20).

To make this idea even more concrete, let me put it another way. I am the medium that is charged with spreading the message of Jesus. You are the medium. All of God’s followers are His chosen medium.

If we return again to McLuhan’s idea that the chosen medium for communicating a message is extremely meaningful, it must be a big deal that God picked us. We are the medium here, after all.

But why? Why us? Studying communication shows us that people who really believe their message, or have experienced something themselves, are often the most effective at passing their passion along to others.

restaurant

Photo Credit: jesuscm via Compfight cc

My former pastor used to use the analogy of restaurants: If you’ve eaten a great meal, and tell others about it, they will want to try out that restaurant too because you are so excited about it!

So, when I consider the importance of God picking US to be his medium, it makes me feel a lot of pressure to step up and do a better job. Also, I need to remember to trust myself, and God, and know that my excitement and passion will easily flow through trough my words.

After all, that’s how communication works.

AML

Refugee. Flight. Displacement.

Photo Credit: Zoriah via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: Zoriah via Compfight cc

Refugee.  Flight.  Displacement.

In The Idea of a Christian College Arthur Holmes reminds us that a Christian college, and by implication those vocationally pursuing the study and application of Christian studies, must rigorously pursue the intersection of their faith within the wholeness of the human experience because “we live in a secular society that compartmentalizes religion and treats it as peripheral or even irrelevant to large areas of life and thought” (Holmes, 9).  The biblical worldview however clearly and consistently admonishes believers to positively contribute to a vision of human flourishing.

People of Christian faith are to live out what the New Testament describes as “good news” in the midst of contexts that are all too often divided, conflicted, and trapped in poverty.  As one example, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in 2014 the number of refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced people worldwide exceeded 50 million people for the first time since World War II.  As the UNHCR rightly notes, “1 family torn apart by war is too many.”  The following facts from the United Nations are indeed sobering:

  • 43.3 million people worldwide forcible displaced due to conflict and persecution
  • 46% of these individuals are children
  • 15 million of these individuals are uprooted from their home country
  • 27 million remain within their country but are internally displaced due to conflict
  • Many lack the essentials of life such as clean water, food and protection from violence and abuse.

These are real people with real needs. (Click to Tweet)

Moreover, the call to stand alongside displaced individuals is central to the biblical narrative.  In fact, there is an entire book within the Old Testament addressing this subject.  The book of Ruth is in part dedicated to establishing an ethic that asks people of faith to contribute to human flourishing by standing alongside those living in the midst of difficult cross-cultural situations.

Ruth is the story of a young woman who found herself in Israel, a country that differed in culture, religion and background from the one in which she was raised.  And what is more, there was a long history of suspicion, hostility and violent armed conflict between the peoples of Moab and Judah.  Imagine yourself as a young, single woman with the responsibility of providing for an older relative, with only limited access to finances, separated from family and friends, and suspiciously viewed with ethnic hostility in all of your daily interactions.

Ruth was forced to glean the leftover grain that was first missed by harvesters and servants, and it is in this context of difficulty and poverty that that the Biblical story introduces Boaz.  Having compassion, Boaz extended an open hand to Ruth and helped her with financial and material goods.  Over the course of the grain and barley harvests this initial relationship grew.

Ruth is usually told as a story of love and marriage or as a foreshadowed celebration of King David or of Christ himself.  These interpretations may be true.  But what is often lost in these themes is the reality that this is also a story about crossing boundaries, of an immigrant who came from a country that was deemed “suspicious,” and about overcoming prejudices by showing compassion and financial generosity specifically to the displaced within our communities.

The book of Ruth is a reminder that people of faith are called to stand in prayer, friendship and practical support with all those within our community who have been displaced, especially those who have experienced the traumas of violence, war and forced flight.  This is where faith, friendship and vocational discipline intersect. (Click to Tweet)

For many in the United States this reality has taken on new meaning as 50,000 unaccompanied minors have sought asylum over the last twelve months.  As the Baptist World Alliance recently noted, many of these individuals are “victimized by separation from their families, economic exploitation, lack of medical care and education [and] discrimination.”  It is our responsibility to “respond to the need for spiritual support and pastoral services for these children” and to “create welcoming communities.”

Behind the overwhelming numerical statistics are individuals who can be influenced by individuals.  This is the power of one connecting with one.  In a way, after all, the believer in Christ is to see themselves in the words of Hebrews 11:13, “[as] foreigners and strangers on earth.”

People of faith let us be among the first who recognize fellow sojourners and to follow the call of the biblical narrative by welcoming the refugees and displaced within our communities.  This week would you commit to doing one of the following:

  • Praying every day for seven days for the refugees and displaced around the world
  • Seeking greater awareness about the reality of the 50,000 unaccompanied minors who have sought asylum along the southern border of the United States
  • Reaching out and befriending an immigrant or refugee in your context and to help build a community of welcome

eb

 

CECS Announces Spring 2014 Bloggers

As our inaugural blogging semester concluded in December 2013, the Center for Excellence in Christian Scholarship issued a call for bloggers to the ETBU faculty members for Spring 2014. This semester we are able to sponsor 3 new faculty bloggers as they endeavor to explore the collisions of faith and academia. Please join us in congratulating our Spring 2014 bloggers – Dr. David Brooks, Associate Professor of Biology & Nursing, Dr. Emily Row Prevost, Director of Leadership Studies, and Dr. Darrell Roe, Associate Professor of Communication Studies. Together they will use their varied vantage points to examine what it means to be a Christian scholar and teacher in today’s world.

Dr. David Brooks, Dr. Emily Row Prevost, and Dr. Darrell Roe

Dr. David Brooks, Dr. Emily Row Prevost, and Dr. Darrell Roe

You will have an opportunity to learn more about our bloggers and their individual journeys next week. Each writer will share a weekly post on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Stop by three times a week to see what they have to say or subscribe via email by signing up on the right side of the page. We hope that you will engage with our authors by leaving comments and asking questions throughout the semester.

Have a topic suggestion for our bloggers? Leave a comment below!

Looking forward to another semester @ The Intersection,

Elizabeth Ponder, MSLS
Program Coordinator, Center for Excellence in Christian Scholarship

Take me deeper than my feet could ever wander…

Watch this Video : http://youtu.be/8H48vMYu1J0

Hillsong United – Oceans (Where my feet may fail)

” Spirit Lead me where my trust is without borders

Let me walk upon the waters

Whenever you would call me

Take me deeper than my feet could ever wander

And my faith will be made stronger

in the presence of the Savior

I will call upon your name

And keep my eyes above the waves

When oceans rise

My soul will rest in your embrace

For I am yours and you are mine”

This past Sunday I was introduced to this praise and worship song. I remember thinking back to lifeguard training. We would tread water for 20 minutes straight with our hands above the water in-order to get our lifeguard certification. We started with 5 minutes, then we trained for 10 minutes. Eventually, we mastered 20 minutes. This skill was required and needed for life saving purposes. If I was drowning, I would want a lifeguard that could tread for as long as needed.

This reflective process has taught me that we set standards, we prepare our students for what we know they will need, and we implement strategies to help them succeed. But in reality, we can only prepare them for so much. So much more learning must take place through life experiences and outside of class assessment.

At this time in the semester, I see many of the students treading water with their head just above water. I challenge my students to cherish these moments. Let God use these moments to prepare them for the road of life ahead. To one day be the leader that is teaching others. My hope is that these moments they share at this university will help them to dig deeper in their faith. My hope is that God will take the moments and use them to draw closer to him.

My challenge to myself is the same. I am in my own journey of “treading water” and I know God is going to lead me to a deeper place in my faith. He is going to stretch my abilities and give me the ‘required skills needed’ to make a difference.***


Podcast Update

I have been tracking the progress of the students viewing the podcast prior to class. Six out of 16 students are viewing the chapter podcast prior to or after class.  In addition, the same 6 are completing all assignments whereas the other 10 are just not. Conclusions: if students do not turn in assignments, they are also not likely to read, listen to the podcasts, or come prepared to class.

In order to increase in-class participation, I started posting the discussion questions from the podcast/reading materials the day prior to class and individually assigning them to a question. Most everyone in class shows up with the answer for their question. This has helped in-class discussion and has given the more introverted students time to prepare to speak in-front of other students. It has also facilitated deeper discussion when the student are prepared to talk about the topics.

Although this process has not been perfect or easy, the process has provided opportunities for students to be responsible and mature learners. These opportunities are crucial for developing critical thinking in higher education.

In summary, I will continue to provide opportunities that facilitate in-class discussion and develops critical thinking opportunities. Today it may involve a podcast, tomorrow it may involve video conferencing or some other type of teaching method.

-LM

Real Live Prof

Semi-sweet. I am really sure that when I took the class, “How to Teach Sociology” at UNT, the prof never covered the end of the semester.

I was in my office this week, between classes, when three students dropped in. One is graduating next week, and is already applying for jobs for which ETBU has well prepared her. She is also getting married next year (she has already picked out the guy, and is asking us to save the date). The second student graduates in the spring, and is already planning on grad school. She too, is applying for jobs in her field. The third student (I have now run out of chairs), is graduating in the spring, and looking at grad school as well. They are all excited about life and the seemingly endless possibilities and permutations. I am very excited for them, and I know they will do very well. I should probably care more that they are so raucous and such frequent visitors, because I am sure “they” disturb the peace of the otherwise somber and tranquil office. But, I love being with students. It is my favorite part of the job. It is also emotionally taxing when they leave.

I know this because they will soon graduate, and be gone. Oh, they will promise to “stay in touch” and will try to do so. I might see some them at the Homecoming football game, or be asked to write a reference letter…and then I will see a posting or status update of theirs on Facebook, and realize I have not seen or heard from them for several years.

Students are also nervous about their futures and all of the unknowns it holds for them. I am always amused when they ask me, “Will you be at my graduation?”

I always respond, tongue in cheek. “I was thinking about not going this semester. However, because you were such a wonderful student, I will go, just for you.” (Of course, I am required to go.) But the truth is, I would not miss it even if I could. Semi-sweet: I love to meet the students’ families and I love to say over and over, “Congratulations!” However, nearly 30 graduation ceremonies (3 per year) have taught me it will probably be the last time I see most of them.

I was eating breakfast very early this morning with my wife Diana, when she said, out of the blue, “I miss my kids”.  One has graduated college, and has a job (The dream comes true!), but she lives 3 hours away. The second is half way through college, and stays gone most of the semester. The third, whom she was about to struggle with waking and getting to school, is in 8th grade. But I know what she means.

Thankful

When you ask a professor to reflect on and blog about her experiences in the classroom, expect there to be a bunch of grousing about students’Bashaw laziness and lack of commitment, and some lamenting about the moral decline of civilization, as seen in the youth of America.

And maybe I have done a fair amount of complaining as I have pondered the intersection of faith, teaching, students, and society this semester.

However, as I reflect on my job as an educator-counselor-learner-mentor-pastor-motivational speaker, there is much more for which I am thankful.

  • I am thankful that God has allowed me to work in a career that demands constant learning, that challenges me to get better and know more every day;
  • I am thankful for the privilege and challenge of teaching the Bible, in its messiness and glory, and for the opportunity to communicate my love for Scripture with my students.
  • I am thankful for daily deadlines (and I also curse this!), that I must keep on top of things and strive for excellence not just for my own improvement but for the education of others.
  • I am thankful for the constant interaction with young people, which forces me to learn how to tweet, compels me to learn new colloquialisms (that’s ill!), and keeps me in touch with the challenges and contributions of this up-and-coming generation.
  • I am thankful for flexibility of my classroom, that my teaching need not fit into a rubric or someone else’s expectation. I can lecture or use pod casts or facilitate discussion or show youtube clips or encourage journaling or sing songs or have confession time, depending on what best communicates a particular subject to my students at a particular time.
  • I am thankful for the teamwork involved in a university setting, that professors and administrators and maintenance crew and IT and cafeteria workers and student workers and resident directors all work together for one noble goal–to provide the best education for our students.
  • And I am thankful for my students: students who are trusting enough to listen and learn, who are brave enough to show vulnerability in the classroom, who are caring enough to support their peers in their needs, who are committed enough to be leaders even in their young age, who are strong enough to overcome all the challenges they face in their personal and private lives in order to remain committed to education and to their faith in the midst of a distracting, discouraging, sometimes dream-crushing world.

For all these things, and all these people, I am truly thankful.

jgb

Collegiality

// Collegiality:

the cooperative relationship of colleagues

One of the best lessons I have learned through this reflection process is to learn from others. Other professors in my department and outside of my department have extended wisdom, and support at times when I needed it.

I used to think that I encountered “unique” issues and situations. I have learned through this reflection experience that we can learn a lot from talking to each other.

It is not weakness to seek others for advice… it is wise to seek those who have the experience and knowledge.

This past week I was approached by a student about a moral/ethical question. I gave her advice, but I could see that it was difficult for her to take the advice because of her current life experiences (don’t worry it wasn’t anything bad or life threatening… it was minor and won’t really make a difference one way or another).  But, the best thing about this encounter is that I saw myself in her. I saw that sometimes I ask advice from more experienced faculty, and sometimes I have a hard time understanding that advice.

I grew a lot from this encounter. It showed me that I can learn a lot from others if I just take the time to understand that my colleagues have that advice to offer. I understand that I am in my own growth process as a professor and that it may be at a different place than other people. AND that’s okay…

I can see myself maturing as a person and as a professional. I don’t do things the same way I did my first year of teaching. In five years, I probably won’t teach the same way I am teaching now. There is nothing wrong with what I am doing now but I hope to learn and to grow.

I am grateful that I am surrounded by co-workers that work together. I hope to continue to grow from using a collaborative approach to evaluate my actions a professor. I plan to be that peer or mentor support to future faculty.

We are stronger when we work together and when we learn from each other.

lm

 

Discipleship in Christian Education

makingdisciples

Disciple:

a:  one who accepts and assists in spreading the doctrines of another
b:  one of the twelve in the inner circle of Christ’s followers according to the Gospel accounts
c:  a convinced adherent of a school or individual


Student’s see professors through a very narrow perspective;  life experiences thus far. They can only compare you to their previous experiences, and they are at the mercy of their current situation. Their perspective influences how they interact with you ,and how they expect you to interact with them.

For instance, at the beginning of the semester I always have a few students that cannot understand why I won’t take late work. They fuss and complain, not getting them any closer to me accepting their late work. By the end of the semester, I don’t have any students kicking and screaming about late work because this is the new ‘norm’ in their perspective.

I think it is important for me to understand and consider why students behave the way they do. They behave this way because, at some point, this behavior got them what they wanted and it was reinforced.  This brings me to my next reflection….

Recently, I had a student that sent me a text to landline message. This type of message occurs when the student decides to send a text message to my office phone rather than calling my office phone.

I was checking my voicemail one day this week and this is what it said in a robot computer voice…

“Hey Dr. McRee. This is (student’s name). I am sorry I missed class. I slept straight through my alarm. I was wondering what all I missed today.”

At first glance, this looks like the student is really trying to get the information from class. However….. After I emailed her back telling her to come to my office to go over what she missed, she did not come to my office. I plan to explain to her in detail that I appreciate her reaching out, but that her efforts were minimal. Technology cannot replace your personal work ethic and follow through.

Am I a bad professor for telling her this? Has no one ever told her this? A number of questions run through my head. I ask fellow professors and they agree that she could improve her professional interaction.

Which brings up another question… How do we as professors help shape our students in ways that are not grade related?

I was at an ETBU leadership workshop ( Breakfast with Fred ) earlier this semester and this was one of the proposed questions. So, I asked my students if they think that I help them develop in the ways listed below. These 10 items were published in a journal article as the “Top 10 Soft Skills Needed in Today’s Workplace”

  1. Integrity
  2. Communication
  3. Courtesy
  4. Responsibility
  5. Interpersonal skills
  6. Positive attitude
  7. Professionalism
  8. Flexibility
  9. Teamwork skills
  10. Work ethic

I personally could only pick out three that I could actually attach a grade to the “soft skill”. BUT, to my surprise… My students justified how I was able to teach them all the 10 skills without always assigning a grade to each of them. We had an honest conversation and it was interesting to see their perspective. I was shocked and told them I was very flattered… I told them that many times I don’t feel like I am able to breakthrough with some of these skills because of the dynamics of grading in higher education. I ensured them that these skills are needed in the real world, but that sometimes I am unsure of how successful I am at implementing them in the classroom.

So, as I reflect back on the TEXT to LANDLINE situation, I can see clearly that this is an opportunity to disciple this student. Interactions such as these do not always lead to a quantified grade, but they do shape the future leaders & graduates of ETBU.

My goals moving forward are to change the perspective of my students early on. To consider where they are, understand why they are the way that they are, and provide support for them to get to the behavior they need. To take situations on a student-by-student basis, and see what they need from me to mature. It is important to disciple our students… even if it means giving them feedback in ways not related to their grades.

LM

Robles, M. M. (2012). Executive Perceptions of the Top 10 Soft Skills Needed in Today’s Workplace. Business Communication Quarterly, 75(4), 453-465. doi:10.1177/1080569912460400